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Corn Pancakes with Homemade Salsa (vegan)
Healthy Eating
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 24 July 2015 18:00

corn_pancakes_salsa

Recipe: 1 cup plain flour /2½ tsp baking powder/½ tsp salt/1 egg replacement /½ cup plant based milk /¾ cup corn kernels. For the salsa: 6 cherry tomatoes diced/¼ avocado diced/1 tsp finely diced onion/a pinch of salt/1 tbs chopped coriander. Mix the flour, baking powder and salt together in a large bowl. Mix the egg replacement and non dairy milk together and add to the flour mix. Stir until well combined. Fold in the corn kernels. Heat a heavy pan over medium heat and melt a mix of oil and vegan butter until it sizzles. Add scoops of batter to the pan, the pancakes should be about 3-4 inches across. Cook for 2-3 minutes until small bubbles appear in the top and start to burst, and the edges start to dry out a bit. Flip and cook for another 2 minutes on the other side. Mix the salsa ingredients together. Serve the pancakes with some vegan butter and the salsa.

 
Reuse Idea: Wooden Pallet? DIY Garden Tool Organizer!
Reuse Tips
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 23 July 2015 17:58

pallet_tool_organizer

 
Pan-Roasted Cauliflower Steaks Recipe with Tomatoes and Capers
Healthy Eating
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 22 July 2015 13:57

pan_roasted_cauliflower

Recipe: 2 tablespoons olive oil/2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced/1/4 teaspoon red chile flakes/1/2 head cauliflower, cut into steaks, plus any leaves/sea salt to taste/1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved/2 tablespoons capers (soaked in water if salted), drained/1 tablespoon chopped Italian parsley. Heat the olive oil in a large cast-iron frying pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and red chile flakes and swirl until fragrant. Add the cauliflower steaks, which should fit in the pan in a single layer, and any extra cauliflower pieces, making sure they are all touching the pan. Season to taste with salt. Cook the steaks without turning until caramelized, about 8 minutes, then flip and cook until browned on the bottom and tender, another 8 to 10 minutes. During the last few minutes, add the cauliflower leaves, tomatoes, and capers and cook until the tomatoes and leaves wilt. Adjust the seasoning with salt, scatter with parsley, and serve immediately.

 
How to Grow Food in a Drought
Blog
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 20 July 2015 16:52

grow_food_in_drought

As California braces for a parched, dry season ahead, many people may be reconsidering the idea of planting a fall vegetable garden at all. However, there are a number of tips to consider, that may still allow you to harvest fresh veggies from your backyard garden. Peas, greens, beets, and radishes will do just fine in the fall. Even plants that like full sun will appreciate just a little bit of afternoon shade if they're struggling with heat and limited water. Situate your garden so that they'll catch a little shade from trees you have on site. No trees? A patio umbrella or strategically placed shade cloth can help.

Consider experimenting with a method of deep watering. Submerge a porous vessel (terra cotta) in the ground near the base of your plants, leaving the top accessible. Fill with water, and it will slowly seep into the ground and be available as the plants need it. Consider deep watering with a drainage pipe or even a nursery pot buried upright next to plants. Instead of watering at the surface, water into the pipe or pot so the water goes straight to the roots. Keyhole gardens, are being used in dry climates as well, and have an active compost pile at their center. The central compost helps nourish the plants growing around it and acts as a source of moisture. Supplemental water goes right into the compost “well.” A soaker hose or drip irrigation system allows you to put water right where you want it. Invest in a simple timer and set it so that it goes off at night. That will give your plants a chance to drink up before the sun heats the ground, causing evaporation. Dry farming tomatoes is a method well-suited to drought. You do need good soil. Essentially, you'll water your tomato plants to get them established, then water sparingly as fruit matures. If you have access to logs, branches, and other natural debris, consider stacking natural material into a mound and planting on top of it. The decomposing matter turns into healthy soil that will hold moisture, requiring little or no irrigation by the second year. Choose vegetables that produce a lot of food per plant. While a broccoli plant provides just a single head, tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants, for example, will produce enough for many meals. Choose vegetables that have a short growing season. Beans, for instance, can produce a full crop in a relatively short amount of time, using less water than a crop that takes longer to mature. Corn is shallow rooted and not a great choice for growing during a drought. Make sure your soil incorporates lots of compost and will be able to hold onto what little moisture there is. Adding 3″ to 4″ inches of mulch will help prevent the soil surface from drying out. Try straw, leaves, grass clippings, or wood chips. Consider burying your organic kitchen waste alongside your plants, so, you're nourishing your plants and also adding a bit more moisture to the soil. Don't let water down the drain if you don't have to! Collect it and use it to water your plants. 1) Warming water for showering or dishwashing? Catch the water in a 5-gallon bucket. Keep a 5-gallon bucket in the shower with you while you're showering to catch some of that water. 2) Water used for cooking pasta, potatoes, or hard boiled eggs can be taken out to the garden once it’s cool. 3) Instead of rinsing dishes under running water, do it camp style. Rinse them in a dish pan, then use the water in the garden. 4) If you're bathing a baby, that water, too, can go out to the garden.

 
Consuming a Plant-Based Diet Results in a More Sustainable Environment...
News
Written by Administrator   
Sunday, 19 July 2015 14:50

plant_based_diet

It also reduces greenhouse gas emissions, while improving longevity, according to new research from Loma Linda University Health.

A study and an article, produced by researchers at Loma Linda University School of Public Health, will be published in full in the July issue of theAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition, and were first presented at the 6th International Congress on Vegetarian Nutrition in 2013. Based on findings that identified food systems as a significant contributor to global warming, the study focuses on the dietary patterns of vegetarians, semi-vegetarians and non-vegetarians to quantify and compare greenhouse gas emissions, as well as assess total mortality. The mortality rate for non-vegetarians was almost 20 percent higher than that for vegetarians and semi-vegetarians. On top of lower mortality rates, switching from non-vegetarian diets to vegetarian diets or even semi-vegetarian diets also helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The vegetarian diets resulted in almost a third less emissions compared to the non-vegetarian diets. Modifying the consumption of animal-based foods can therefore be a feasible and effective tool for climate change mitigation and public health improvements, the study concluded. Read more: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140625145536.htm

 
Avocado and Cherry Tomato Salad
Healthy Eating
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 10 July 2015 12:55

avocado_cherry_tomato_salad

Recipe: 4 firm-ripe avocados, halved, pitted, peeled and cut into chunks /1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes, halved crosswise /1/4 cup pine nuts, toasted /1/4 cup lime vinaigrette /sea salt /freshly ground black pepper. In a mixing bowl, combine avocados, tomatoes, pine nuts and vinaigrette. Toss gently and season with salt and pepper. Lime Vinaigrette: Juice of 2 to 3 limes /1 tablespoon honey (or vegan option)/1 teaspoon Dijon mustard/1 garlic clove, minced/1 teaspoon coarse salt/1 teaspoon black pepper/2/3 cup olive oil/3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves In a blender, combine lime juice, honey, mustard, garlic, salt and pepper. Blend on medium speed for a few seconds, and then reduce the speed to low. With the motor running, slowly add the oil until emulsified. Pour into a container or jar and mix in cilantro.

 
Weeds Can't Take The Heat!
Blog
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 08 July 2015 14:52

weed_heat

Everyone knows that using too much fertilizer, insecticide, herbicide, and fungicide on crops damages the environment, in particular, water resources. However, most of us do just that in our own gardens and produce the same type of pollution. Here is an alternative to chemical herbicide: Pour boiling water on the weeds. Using heat will cause them to turn brown within a few hours, much like the effect of using a contact herbicide with one major difference. There is no toxic residue and the area is immediately safe for children!

 
Use Junk Mail as Garden Mulch...
Blog
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 24 July 2015 11:59

junk_garden_mulch

Retain the moisture in your soil. One of the best ways to retain moisture in your soil is by using mulch. Not only will mulch assist in water retention, it will keep weeds at bay and add nutrients and matter to your soil profile. You can literally lay out junk mail or old newspapers on your garden as a mulch. This makes an excellent weed barrier and will have all the benefits of traditional mulch. But since this is a little aesthetically displeasing, you might also want to cover with a layer of leaves or other traditional mulch. Alternatively, you can also shred junk mail or old newspapers first and then lay them as mulch. This will break down easier.

 
Tomato, Avocado, Mozzarella, and Grilled Cheese
Healthy Eating
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 23 July 2015 14:58

avocado_grilled_cheese

Recipe: Bread of choice/1 avocado sliced/sliced mozzarella cheese (dairy free optional)/1 tomato sliced/1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil/sea salt and fresh ground pepper to taste. Heat skillet over medium heat. Add a little olive oil (or butter optional) Place one slice of bread onto pan. Add mozzarella, avocado and tomato. Drizzle with a bit of olive oil, and add sea salt and black pepper to taste. Cook on both sides until golden brown.

 
Reuse Idea: Old Headboard? DIY Handy Corner Bench!
Reuse Tips
Written by Administrator   
Tuesday, 21 July 2015 08:56

reuse_headboard_bench

 
Spicy Asian Garlic Broccoli...
Healthy Eating
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 20 July 2015 10:51

Spicy_asian_garlic_broccoli

Recipe: 1 ½ teaspoons red wine vinegar /1/2 teaspoon sea salt/2 heads broccoli, cut into bite-size florets/ 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil /4 garlic cloves, minced /2 teaspoons cumin seeds /2 teaspoons roasted sesame oil/ pinch crushed red pepper flakes. In a large bowl, stir together the vinegar and salt. Add broccoli and toss to combine. In a large skillet, heat olive oil until hot, but not smoking. Add garlic and cumin and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in sesame oil and pepper flakes. Pour mixture over broccoli and toss well. Let sit for at least 1 hour at room temperature, and up to 48.

 
Raw Zucchini Ribbon Salad...
Healthy Eating
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 13 July 2015 18:54

 zucchini_ribbon_salad

 

 


Use a vegetable peeler to shave long, thin strips of zucchini (stop when you reach the seedy inner core). Toss with lemon juice, olive oil and a pinch of sea salt and pepper for a bright-tasting, no-cook salad.

 
Reuse Idea: Wine Corks? Handy Bulletin Board!
Reuse Tips
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 09 July 2015 09:53

reuse_corkboard

 
Zucchini Potato Pancakes...
Healthy Eating
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 08 July 2015 11:51

zucchini_potato_pancakes

Recipe: 2 cups peeled and grated potatoes /2 cups of grated zucchini /1/4 cup onion, diced /3 cloves garlic, chopped /2 tablespoons olive oil /2 eggs (optional egg replacer)/1/2 teaspoon baking powder/1/3 cup flour (optional gluten free) /1/2 teaspoon sea salt /1/4 teaspoon pepper /coconut oil for frying. In a large bowl, combine all ingredients. Mix well. In a skillet, heat coconut oil over medium-high heat. Drop by tablespoonfuls into oil. Cook about 3 minutes per side or until golden brown, turning once. Drain on paper towels.

 
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